Snow Bound. Ref: sonofthesouth.net

Snow Bound. Ref: sonofthesouth.net

It’s a common misconception among layman even and the most staunchly devout Tipi Lovers that tipis are seasonal or temporary structures.

If this was the case then the Glastonbury muddy mayhem would have us sleep in a canoe rather than a tipi for the purposes of keeping dry during what seems to be mandatory torrential rain at this music extravaganza.

I wonder if Cochise would have approved of his traditional ‘Mother’s Skirt’ tipi dwelling for revelers of contemporary music?

Here is a snippet about of this North American Native Legend. (more…)

“The Sun Dance”

The predominant tribal ceremony of Great Plains Indians

The predominant tribal ceremony of Great Plains Indians

The tribes who lived on the Great Plains of North America believed that supernatural power was to be found in everything around them. It was in the wind, rain, thunder and other forces of nature. It was in the sun, moon and stars, and in animals and birds. The Sioux Indians called this all-pervading power Wakan Tanka, the Great Mystery.

For the Sioux, it was Wakan Tanka who was the creator and controller of the universe, but other tribes had their own tales about how the world had come into being. According to Crow myth, for example, the whole world had originally been covered with a sheet of water. (more…)

Pawnee Legend

The Coyote and The Offended Rolling Stone

Coyote

Coyote

Coyote was going along, and as he had not had anything to eat for some time he was very hungry. In the evening he went to a high hill and sat down. Early the next morning he started again. He came to a big round stone.

He took out his knife and said: “Grandfather, this knife I give to you as a present. I want you to help me to get something to eat.” (more…)

Sioux Tipi ... reference: nakedauthors.com

Sioux Tipi ... reference: nakedauthors.com


Tipi is a Sioux word, meaning “to dwell in,” for the lodge used by that nation (the Dakota) and most Indians of the Great Plains because they subsisted almost entirely on the vast herds of buffalo which they followed from place to place. The Ojibway, who feared the warlike Sioux, called it “bwahn wig’ wahm” (enemy dwelling). (more…)

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